Skip Navigation

19 February 2015

Lunar New Year Greetings from USCIS

(By Juliet K. Choi, USCIS Chief of Staff)

On behalf of Director León Rodríguez  and all the staff of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), I extend my very sincere wishes to all those celebrating the Lunar New Year – the year of the goat, sheep or ram – particularly those in the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities.

The AAPI community is as great and strong as it is diverse, including recent immigrants and refugees to those who have been here for generations.  AAPIs literally helped build this great nation, working to connect the East Coast and the West Coast through the transcontinental railroad.  Like all immigrant communities, AAPIs are business owners, innovators, students, public servants and service members.  And many will be celebrating the Lunar New Year.

Lunar New Year celebrations across the country remind us that we are a nation that has benefited from our diverse cultures, languages and backgrounds.  While we may have different stories and journeys, we are united in the belief that if you work hard and play by the rules, you should be able to get ahead.  All of us, from those that have been here for generations to those that immigrated recently, seek to create better opportunities for our families, children, and loved ones.

Values such as integrity, respect, ingenuity and vigilance are core to the work we do every day.  As part of our commitment to the AAPI community, and as part of the President’s Task Force on New Americans, we are working to better integrate new Americans and support state and local efforts to do the same.  We were excited to offer recent stakeholder engagements in Korean, Vietnamese and Chinese to better reach our underserved and limited English proficient customers. We believe everyone deserves access to the information and pathways that will fulfill their dream of becoming an American. We look forward to continuing to engage with you at future stakeholder events.

So as we mark the Lunar New Year, we at USCIS wish those celebrating – and their loved ones – peace, prosperity, and good health.

06 February 2015

International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation and Cutting

February 6 is the International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C). Today we stand together with the White House, the Department of State, and a host of other U.S. government agencies to put an end to FGM/C and to protect the health and well-being of women and girls here in the United States and around the world.  

According to the United Nations, over 140 million women and girls have undergone some form of FGM/C. If current trends continue, another 86 million girls will be victims of FGM/C by 2030. This is not a problem confined to distant lands or times. FGM/C is happening to women and girls today, and right here in our own backyard. Within diaspora communities around the United States, girls are being cut on U.S. soil or sent abroad to undergo the procedure.   

In the 21st century, no woman or girl should have to experience the deep psychological and health risks associated with FGM/C. As President Obama has said, FGM/C is a tradition that’s not worth keeping and should be eliminated. 

The U.S. government considers FGM/C to be a serious human rights abuse, gender-based violence, and child abuse. It is against U.S. law to perform FGM/C on a girl, or to send or attempt to send a girl outside the United States so that FGM/C can be performed. Violating the laws against FGM/C may also have significant immigration consequences.

USCIS, together with the White House and numerous U.S. government agencies, is working both here in the United States and overseas in countries where women and girls are subjected to this practice to help educate communities about the serious, damaging effects of FGM/C.
Many countries have taken steps to raise awareness of the injustice of FGM/C, but it will take all of us, working together, to end this practice once and for all. 

If you believe you are at risk of FGM/C, know of someone at risk of FGM/C, have questions about FGM/C, or have undergone FGM/C and need help or further information, please call this hotline for information about available resources: 1-800-994-9662

More information about the practice of FGM/C can be found in this U.S. Government Fact Sheet and on the United Nations’ Zero Tolerance Day website.


-  Lori Scialabba,  Deputy Director  of  U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Día Internacional de Cero Tolerancia contra la Mutilación Femenina

El 6 de febrero es el Día internacional de Cero Tolerancia con la Mutilación Genital (FGM/C, por sus siglas en inglés). Hoy nos unimos a la casa Blanca y a otras agencias gubernamentales para poner un alto a la mutilación genital y proteger la salud y el bienestar de mujeres y niñas aquí en Estados Unidos y en todo el mundo.

De acuerdo con las Naciones Unidas, más de 140 millones de mujeres y niñas han pasado por alguna forma de mutilación genital femenina. Si la tendencia actual continúa, otros 86 millones de niñas se habrán convertido en víctimas de ello para el año 2030. Este no es un problema confinado sólo a tierras o tiempos distantes. La mutilación genital femenina es algo que está sucediéndole a mujeres y niñas hoy día, aquí mismo en nuestro patio trasero. En una diáspora de comunidades alrededor de EE.UU., las niñas pasan por el proceso de mutilación aquí en suelo americano o son enviadas al extranjero a que se les practique.

En el siglo 21 ninguna niña o mujer debe tener que experimentar las profundas heridas psicológicas y riesgos a la salud asociados con la mutilación. Según lo expresado por el presidente Obama, La mutilación femenina es una tradición que no vale la pena mantener y que debe ser erradicada.

El gobierno de EE.UU. considera la mutilación femenina serio problema de violación de derechos humanos, violencia basada en género y abuso de menores. Es contrario a la ley de EE.UU. practicar la mutilación a una niña, enviarla o intentar enviarla fuera de EE.UU. para que se le pueda mutilar. Violar las leyes contra la mutilación femenina puede también tener serias repercusiones de inmigración.

USCIS, en conjunto con la Casa Blanca y numerosas agencias gubernamentales, están trabajando aquí en EE.UU. y en países extranjeros donde mujeres y niñas están sujetas a esta práctica para educar a las comunidades acerca de los serios efectos nocivos de la mutilación.

Muchos países han dado pasos hacia la concienciación sobre la injusticia de la mutilación, nos toca a todos trabajar en conjunto para erradicar esta práctica de una vez y por todas.

Si usted cree que está en riesgo de mutilación femenina, conoce a alguien en riesgo, tiene preguntas o ha sido objeto de una mutilación y necesita saber más sobre ello, por favor llame a esta línea directa para información acerca de los servicios disponibles: 1-800-994-9662.

Puede encontrar más información sobre la práctica de la mutilación femenina en la Hoja de Datos del Gobierno de EE.UU. y en el sitio web de las Naciones Unidas del Día de Cero Tolerancia.

02 February 2015

Give Your Ideas to the President’s Task Force on New Americans: Call-In Sessions Feb. 3 and 5

We were honored that hundreds of people joined members of the President’s White House Task Force on New Americans on Jan. 29 for the first of three teleconferences to provide feedback on the best ways to successfully integrate immigrants into communities.

The Task Force is an interagency effort to develop a coordinated federal strategy to better integrate new Americans into communities. The Task Force needs to hear from individuals and organizations working in communities across the country to inform this federal strategy.

During our first listening session, which focused on federal strategies to strengthen the role of receiving communities, we asked participants for feedback on these questions:
  • How can existing federal programs be used to increase meaningful engagement between new immigrants and receiving communities? 
  • How can the federal government better communicate to the general public the benefits of integrating immigrants into communities?  
  • What are some promising practices, including state or local models, for a national immigrant integration program? 
  • What mechanisms are being used to elevate or highlight these promising practices beyond the local level, and what can the federal government do to help support, expand or replicate these model programs? 
  • How can federal agencies bolster successful private sector investments, public-private partnerships and philanthropic efforts to support immigrant integration?
On Tuesday, Feb. 3, the next listening session will focus on strategies to integrate new Americans into our nation’s economy and help them learn English. Register now. We will ask these questions:
  • What barriers keep immigrants from accessing English language and other educational and skills training programs, or from reaching their full potential in the labor market? 
  • What are some promising practices, including state or local models, that have succeeded in promoting economic or linguistic integration?
  • What mechanisms are being used to elevate or highlight these promising practices beyond the local level, and what can the federal government do to help support, expand or replicate these model programs?
  • How can the federal government better promote the contributions of immigrants?
  • How can federal agencies bolster successful private sector investments, public-private partnerships and philanthropic efforts to support the economic and linguistic integration of immigrants?
On Thursday, Feb. 5, our final listening session will focus on strengthening the civic integration of new Americans. Register now. We will ask these questions:
  • What barriers exist at the local level that keep immigrants from accessing citizenship preparation programs or services? 
  • What are some promising practices, including state or local models, that have succeeded in promoting civic integration?
  • What mechanisms are being used to elevate or highlight these promising practices beyond the local level, and what can the federal government do to help support, expand or replicate these model programs?
  • How can the federal government better promote the contributions of immigrants?
  • How can federal agencies bolster successful private sector investments, public-private partnerships and philanthropic efforts to support civic integration?
Your ideas will help shape the recommendations that the Task Force provides to President Obama in March. In addition to participating in our listening sessions, you can send comments and answers to any of these questions to NewAmericans@who.eop.gov by Feb. 9.

Comparta sus ideas con Grupo de Trabajo de la Casa Blanca sobre Nuevos Estadounidenses: sesiones por teléfono el 3 y el 5 de febrero

Nos sentimos honrados de que cientos de personas se hayan unido el 29 de enero a los miembros del Grupo de Trabajo de la Casa Blanca sobre Nuevos Estadounidenses instituido por el Presidente en la primera de tres teleconferencias para proporcionar información sobre las maneras más efectivas para integrar con éxito a los inmigrantes en las comunidades. 
 
El Grupo de Trabajo es un esfuerzo entre agencias para desarrollar una estrategia federal coordinada a fin de integrar mejor a los nuevos estadounidenses en las comunidades. El Grupo de Trabajo desea escuchar a las personas y organizaciones que trabajan en las comunidades a través de toda la nación para informar sobre esta estrategia federal.
 
Durante nuestra primera charla interactiva, que se centró en las estrategias federales para fortalecer el papel de las comunidades que reciben inmigrantes, les pedimos a los participantes su opinión sobre las siguientes preguntas:
  • ¿Cómo se pueden utilizar los programas federales existentes para aumentar la participación significativa entre los nuevos inmigrantes y las comunidades que los reciben?
  • ¿Cómo puede el gobierno federal comunicar mejor al público en general los beneficios de la integración de los inmigrantes en las comunidades?
  • ¿Cuáles son algunas de las prácticas prometedoras, incluyendo los modelos estatales o locales, para un programa nacional de integración de inmigrantes?
  • ¿Qué mecanismos se están utilizando para elevar o resaltar estas prácticas prometedoras más allá del nivel local, y qué puede hacer el gobierno federal para ayudar a apoyar, ampliar o replicar estos programas modelo?
  • ¿Cómo pueden las agencias federales impulsar inversiones exitosas por parte del sector privado, las asociaciones público-privadas y los esfuerzos filantrópicos de apoyo a la integración de inmigrantes?
El martes, 3 de febrero, la próxima sesión se centrará en las estrategias para integrar a nuevos estadounidenses en la economía de nuestra nación y ayudarles a aprender inglés. Regístrese ahora. Haremos las siguientes preguntas:
  • ¿Qué barreras impiden a los inmigrantes acceder al idioma inglés y a otros programas de formación educativa y desarrollo de habilidades, o de alcanzar su pleno potencial en el mercado de trabajo?
  • ¿Cuáles son algunas de las prácticas prometedoras, incluyendo modelos estatales o locales, que han tenido éxito en la promoción de la integración económica o lingüística?
  • ¿Qué mecanismos se están utilizando para elevar o resaltar estas prácticas prometedoras allá del nivel local, y qué puede hacer el gobierno federal para ayudar a apoyar, ampliar o replicar estos programas modelo?
  • ¿Cómo puede el gobierno federal promover más efectivamente las contribuciones de los inmigrantes?
  • ¿Cómo pueden las agencias federales impulsar inversiones exitosas por parte del sector privado, las asociaciones públicas y privadas y los esfuerzos filantrópicos de apoyo a la integración económica y lingüística de los inmigrantes?
El jueves, 5 de febrero, nuestra última sesión se centrará en el fortalecimiento de la integración cívica de los nuevos estadounidenses. Regístrese ahora. Haremos las siguientes preguntas:
  • ¿Qué barreras existen a nivel local que impiden que los inmigrantes tengan acceso a programas o servicios de preparación para la ciudadanía?
  • ¿Cuáles son algunas de las prácticas prometedoras, incluyendo los modelos estatales o locales, que han tenido éxito en la promoción de la integración cívica?
  • ¿Qué mecanismos se están utilizando para elevar o resaltar estas prácticas prometedoras más allá del nivel local, y qué puede hacer el gobierno federal para ayudar a apoyar, ampliar o replicar estos programas modelo?
  • ¿Cómo puede el gobierno federal promover mejor las contribuciones de los inmigrantes? 
  • ¿Cómo pueden las agencias federales impulsar inversiones exitosas por parte del sector privado, las asociaciones públicas y privadas y los esfuerzos filantrópicos para apoyar la integración cívica?
Sus ideas nos ayudarán a dar forma a las recomendaciones que el Grupo de Trabajo hará al Presidente Obama en marzo. Además de participar en nuestras c, usted puede enviar sus comentarios y respuestas a alguna de estas preguntas a NewAmericans@who.eop.gov antes del 9 de febrero.
 
 

Labels:

29 January 2015

Enrolled Employers Can Now Display the E-Verify Participation Poster in More Languages

Employers enrolled in E-Verify can now display participation posters in English and 17 foreign languages.

E-Verify employers are required to display the English and Spanish versions of the poster where current and prospective employees can view them. They also have the option of displaying translated versions of the poster in other languages.

E-Verify offers a variety of other foreign language resources, including Spanish versions of the E-Verify website and I-9 Central website.

All employers in the United States are required to verify the employment eligibility of everyone they hire. More than half a million employers are using E-Verify at more than 1.8 million hiring sites.

E-Verify, operated by USCIS, is a fast and free Internet-based system that confirms employment eligibility by comparing information from an employee's Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification, to Department of Homeland Security and Social Security Administration records.

Labels:

Empleadores inscritos pueden exhibir los afiches de participación en E-Verify en más idiomas

Los empleadores inscritos en E-Verify ahora pueden exhibir los afiches de participación en inglés y 17 idiomas adicionales. 

A los empleadores que participan en E-Verify se les requiere exhibir versiones en inglés y español del afiche en un lugar donde los empleados puedan verlo. También tienen la opción de exhibir versiones traducidas en otros idiomas.

E-Verify ofrece una variedad de recursos en diversidad de idiomas, incluyendo versiones en español del sitio web de E-Verify y de Central I-9.

A los empleadores en los Estados Unidos se les requiere verificar la elegibilidad de empleo de todas las personas que contratan. Más de medio millón de empleadores están utilizando E-Verify en más de 1.8 millones de lugares de contratación.

E-Verify, operado de USCIS, es un rápido y gratuito sistema basado en internet que confirma la elegibilidad de empleo, al comparar información procedente del Formulario I-9, Verificación de Elegibilidad de Empleo, con los registros del Departamento de Seguridad Nacional y la Administración de Seguro Social.

Labels:

15 January 2015

USCIS Hosts First National Arabic Engagement (“Musharakah”)

USCIS was proud to host its first Arabic language outreach event last month at the Arab-American National Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. “Musharakah” (meaning “engage with”) is part of an ongoing USCIS initiative to reach out to various underserved communities.

The event included an overview of the naturalization process and a question and answer session. USCIS staff answered questions submitted by the public in person and by phone, email, Twitter, and from 5 viewing parties held in Anaheim, California; Brooklyn, New York; Irving, Texas; and Redmond and Renton, Washington. They also responded to questions about eligibility and application requirements for becoming a lawful permanent resident. 

“You couldn’t have chosen a better place to have [this event] because this museum is all about coming to America for a better life,” Amne Darwish-Talab, director of outreach for the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services (ACCESS). 

USCIS Director León Rodríguez’s recorded greeting in Arabic kicked off the event. 

Debra Rogers, deputy associate director of USCIS’ Customer Service and Public Engagement Directorate, noted the diversity of the Arab population in the United States. 

“You represent many different countries, cultures and family histories,” Rogers said. “Our differences make our country more vibrant and diverse. It is one of our greatest strengths as a nation.”

USCIS plans to hold more national Arabic language events in the future as a part of its efforts to reach out to those with limited English proficiency and to engage with Arabic-speaking communities.

You can watch the entire engagement to learn more about the naturalization process. You can also view previous engagements in English and other languages.

Labels: