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02 September 2010

This September - Honoring and Celebrating Citizenship

The United States honors Constitution Day and Citizenship Day each year on September 17. I can't think of a better opportunity to celebrate our newest citizens and the importance of citizenship to this nation.

Last year, more than 750,000 people became naturalized U.S. citizens. On average, our country welcomes approximately one million new permanent residents, and more than 650,000 new citizens naturalize each year. Even with our great diversity as a nation of immigrants, there are strong bonds that unite us all as Americans. These bonds are formed through a belief and commitment to the same ideals that led to the creation of our nation - liberty, equality, and justice.

As individuals, as communities, and as a nation, we continually strive to realize these ideals more fully. People come from all over the world to experience America's promise of freedom and opportunity. Becoming a U.S. citizen is an important step on that journey. Learning English, understanding our history, and having a vested stake in the future of this country not only strengthens immigrants and their families, but benefits our entire nation as well.

At USCIS, we plan to dedicate the month of September to the celebration of citizenship. Throughout the month, we have several special events and announcements scheduled. A few highlights include:

  • Special naturalization ceremonies at national park sites such as the Lincoln Memorial, Grand Canyon National Park, and the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial in St. Louis, MO.;
  • The announcement of approximately 50 new grant recipients as part of the Citizenship and Integration Grant Program; and
  • The launch of a free online Citizenship Resource Center to help applicants and educators prepare for the naturalization process and test.
September promises to be an exciting month. Please join us in celebrating Constitution Day and Citizenship Day this year and take a moment to reflect on the enduring promise of America and what it means to you.

Rebecca S. Carson
Chief, Office of Citizenship

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33 Comments:

At September 3, 2010 at 11:21:00 AM EDT , Anonymous Jobs4Americans said...

Why are importing so many people while MILLIONS of American citizens are out of work? Its ridiculous that we keep importing foreign workers for American citizens to have to compete for jobs in their own country!!!! I think anyone who supports the over a million imported foreign workers and allowing anyone who wants to come here legally or illegally should really read , On the Immorality of Illegal Immigration- A Priest Poses an Alternative Christian View by Fr Patrick J. Bascio (updated version). It talks about how illegal and LEGAL Immigration is devastating to the Black community, how our bringing in so many scientists, doctors & other healthcare providers is keeping other countries underdeveloped, instead we need to educate Americans to provide these services. If someone supports open borders,Amnesty & mass immigration I suggest you read this book & if you still support Amnesty & open borders, then you DONT care about AMERICANS!! Fr Bascio talks On the Immorality of Illegal Immigration http://www.moralimmigration.org/bascio_video.htm
Its NOT that I dont care about persons from other countries but we cant keep this up, our economy is going in the pot. If America goes under who is going
help our fellow brothers and sister in other countries.

 
At September 3, 2010 at 7:42:00 PM EDT , Anonymous JoeF said...

Oh, another isolationist who doesn't understand the first thing about economics.
This country needs more immigration, not less.

 
At September 5, 2010 at 11:58:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

@Jobs for Americans....

I absolutely agree...It is high time that US safeguards its industry. Outsourcing manufacturing and services jobs is akin to transferring wealth to India and China....the middle class in US is struggling to make the ends meet. This further complicates..leading to the need to pay un-employment, less taxes to govt. Less purchasing power in the hands of middle class effects the entire economy...be it housing or any other segment.

Foreign Companies operating here are trying further to destroy jobs in the US and ship jobs overseas. They use the liberal Visa policy offered by the US. They don’t bring in any niche talent that benefits this country. They import foreign workers with the intent of offshoring work back to their countries. They have no interest in investing in America's youngsters or future. They haven't invested a penny to build an operation in the US that helps the US public at large or partner with US educational institutions to groom the youngsters. They are doing all these in their home countries. Their primary intent is to maximize transfer of wealth and invest nothing at home here in the US.

I am amazed at the audacity of one of the companies in openly saying about this...a stance which isn't in the benefit of the US govt or public
# ship more work offshore
# create no new jobs in the US
http://www.business-standard.com/india/news/infosys-plans-%5Cextreme-offshore%5C-model-to-tide-over-visa-crisis/406424/

 
At September 6, 2010 at 12:35:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Jobs4Americans is a troll. Hey, when you sell american products everywhere else in the world - Dont you ever think of the jobs lost in those countries ? And you cry loud when they come here to actually contribute to this economy !

 
At September 8, 2010 at 1:36:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Unrelated to all these posts & maybe something to do with citizenship, it would be nice if the US government considered the time one waits awaiting adjustment of status for a green card count towards the 5 year period after the green card for citizenship. Since a person is considered a "resident" for tax purposes by meeting the physical presence requirement for 5 years, this would benefit those "residents" who have held some legal status but not have got their green card & have been good "citizens" including paying their taxes.

Considering how USCIS is celebrating citizenship, why hasn't the organization ever helped draft this sensible policy?

 
At September 9, 2010 at 2:15:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Number of VISA numbers are same for EB2 I and EB3 I or not???

If in case same....why we not getting any approvals for EB3 compare to EB2?
I can understand why EB3 in 2001 and EB2 in 2006..
but my question is .... why Eb3 is not moving when EB2 is moving?

 
At September 9, 2010 at 5:30:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

The October 2010 Visa bulletin is OUT. I've been expecting it since April this year, which was the last month where EB3 Mexico was available.

The October bulletin is very important because it is the first month of the fiscal year, and it sets the tone for year 2011. I have put all my hopes and payers on it, and I just found out that the EB3 Mexico category did not go forward as I expected, all the contrary IT RETROGRESSED for over a year since last April!!!!!
How can this be possible !!!!!!!!!!!!!, for the last 2 years it has retrogressed a lot, and then "UNAVALIABLE" for the last five months.

I've been a legal and responsable citizen in this country for almost 12 years, and today's bulletin feels much worse than a punch in my face.

I'll appreciate if someone can explain to me the reason why this unfair retrogration on the EB3 Mexico category.

Sorry, Congratulations to all of those who are getting citizenship.

 
At September 10, 2010 at 1:49:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

USCIS Leadership,

Please do something to help EB3-I.

God bless you all!!

 
At September 10, 2010 at 9:03:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

SCIS has not accepted any application for change of status after July 2007. Some says it was mistake and some say it was process inside USCIS that made to accept large volume of Applications.

But my question is after placing these measures , will USCIS start accepting new applications ( I meant for INDIA and CHINA) in EB2 Category?

USCIS should accept more applications and let USCIS keep the number of visa approval based on QUOTA per country.

It would be a WIN-WIN situation for both ( USCIS and LEGAL applicants). USCIS would know the exact number of Applications per Category and Increased number of Fees from Each applicant.

The Applicants will be Granted Interim Relief with EAD and Advance payrole to work and travel.

I still don't see even a single memo towards Accepting new Applications from INDIA and CHINA when measures to tighten up the EB2 Category are taken.

It is a good step taken but more steps are required to reduce and see the correct backlog per category.

 
At September 10, 2010 at 9:03:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Even the Director of USCIS knows immigrants better than anyone else.

Just a simple calculation. Total number of EB2 Pending is 34325 which includes the Dependents also.

That means Only 17K Advance professional knowledge holder(Primary) case are pending. These 17K jobs are taken in High profile industry or Phd Holders in University which the country needs to grow. That is no where near the unemployment ( Manufacture and Retail market) around 8 Million there.

The Immigrants are high income generators & eventually pay higher Tax back to the country. They Buy Big houses and Multiple cars which again benefit the country.

The checks like the memo issued for more checks are always welcome by Immigrant community as everyone want fair process.

but we also want USCIS to allow Filling the EAD and AC21 for all EB2 Applicants irrespective retrogressed country.

 
At September 10, 2010 at 9:19:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Liberal Central Asian said...

I recently became lawful permanent resident of the United States through my job and I am very proud of it. I love America as much as every American does, even more. I belive that I have done and I am doing my best to protect and support the interests of the United States of America through my career. And I am looking forward to become a US citizen after 5 years.

As a public relations professional with outstanding experience, I would suggest U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to improve immigrants and visitors rights monitoring system for airports.

The first time I entered the United States 2 years ago, JFK police had interrogated me in a very rude way just for my name was a Muslim name (I believe). After being kept in an enclosed holding area, I was finally allowed to enter the country that I was dreaming whole my life.

My second travel to the United States recently was for immigration process and I was again interrogated by the airport police in DC, appearantly for my name was a Muslim name. When my hands started to shake because of the repeated interrogations at different places at the DC airport, the police started to make pressure on me even further asking "Hey, why are your hands shaking?".

Well, to be very frank, I was a bit dissappointed to face such tough interrogations in a country which is known to be the leading protector of civil right, liberties and democracy on this planet.

I have traveled to many countries, some of them were very repressive, and have never seen myself treated in a way Homeland Security showed those times. United States must protect its image and serve as a good example for other countries in the world. Civil rights and liberties are the fundamental values of the United States.

Congratulations to all of those who are getting citizenship and wish them happy and responsible life. I believe that being a U.S. citizen is more valuable than anything else.

I love America!

M.

 
At September 11, 2010 at 2:41:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think it is all about reducing cost. Importing talented foreigners is one efficient way of reducing cost, thus making American products more competitive.

You could close your country and still do well only if you could produce high tech products that others can not.


With the world connected by the Internet, most technologies are transferred faster than you could blink. The US does not have any edge in any area except military and medicine. Banking was good until 2008.

If the US does not shift manufacturing jobs to China, other countries such as Japan and Germany will. If every Dell was made in the US, it would cost 2000 dollars instead of 500. Then how is it possible that Dell could compete with Sony that makes everything in China?

In addition, if the US likes to sell her products to other countries, other countries would expect the US to open her door too.

So isolation is absolutely a disaster.

 
At September 13, 2010 at 3:01:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Dear USCIS,

It has been FOUR months since the "Pending Employment-Based I-485 Inventory" report was updated on www.uscis.gov

Could you please update it??

Thanks.

 
At September 14, 2010 at 10:17:00 AM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Please kindly read below article from New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/14/opinion/14orrenius.html?_r=2&scp=1&sq=foreign%20stimulus&st=cse

 
At September 14, 2010 at 1:23:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am impressed, and amazed as to how many people would like to become american citizen, i have done my testing and interview for over two months, all these cermonies over the country, makes me wonder what is the state of Tennessee doing , with all the people who are waiting.

 
At September 14, 2010 at 2:44:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

The country has an antiquated, jerry-built immigration system that fails on almost every count. The good news is that there is a way to replace it that will promote economic growth while reducing the flow of illegal workers.
First, work-based visas should become the norm in immigration, not the exception. The United States issues about 1.1 million green cards a year and allocates roughly 85 percent to family members of American citizens or legal residents, people seeking humanitarian refuge and “diversity immigrants,” who come from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States.

The remaining 15 percent go to people who are immigrating for work reasons — but half of these are for workers’ spouses and children, leaving a mere 7 percent for so-called principal workers, most of whom are highly skilled. No other major Western economy gives such a low priority to employment-based immigration, and for good reason: these immigrants are the most skilled and least likely to be a burden on taxpayers.

With so few slots allocated to work-based green cards, wait times continue to grow. Immigrants typically enter on temporary visas and adjust to permanent status over time. But most green card categories have strict numerical limits that fall far short of the number of immigrants on temporary visas who wish to stay. The most recent data suggest that 1.1 million approved applicants are waiting for employment-based green cards. Immigrants from China and India are among the most adversely affected because, in general, no more than 7 percent of green cards can be allotted each year to applicants from any one country.

There is a better way. Provisional work-based visas, sponsored by employers and valid as long as the holder has a job, should replace green cards as the primary path to legal immigration. These visas should not be subject to country quotas and should be open-ended, so that people who don’t seek permanent residency will not get kicked out of the country, as happens now.

The visas would be “portable” — that is, the holder wouldn’t be tied to one employer — to ensure that workers are treated fairly. But because these visas would be tied to employment, immigrants would have to leave the country if the economy deteriorated and they couldn’t find work.

In place of our current system’s lotteries and “first-come, first-served” policies, the government should hold regular auctions where companies can bid for permits to bring in foreign workers. Employers would bid highest for the most-valued workers, creating a selection mechanism that wouldn’t rely on the judgment of bureaucrats or the paperwork skills of immigration lawyers.

Separate auctions would be run for high- and low-skilled workers, because permit prices would depend on prospective wages. Bringing low-skilled workers into the program is vital to stemming illegal immigration, as the current system’s lack of sufficient visas for the low-skilled is a main reason that people cross the border illegally.

These auctions would be more efficient than the current system because they would respond to changes in labor demand. When prices rose, the government could react by increasing the number of permits, better syncing immigration with the business cycle. Work-based immigration would rise with economic growth and fall with rising unemployment.

Finally, the auctions would provide the government with new revenue in an era of huge deficits. Some of that money might be used to offset costs incurred by states or localities with large numbers of immigrants, or to retrain American workers displaced by immigration.

For the past two decades, policy makers have tinkered on the margins of the immigration system, reacting to the latest crisis or political priority. Greater emphasis on work-based immigration as part of a coherent immigration process would go a long way to enhance our economy’s competitiveness and the nation’s well-being.

 
At September 15, 2010 at 10:27:00 AM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

In the previous comment, some one pointed out statistical data of how many work based green card is issued compared to family, lottery and other humanitarian based GC.

I read from some article that Canada gives 58% of its LPR on work based category than humanitarian category for its economy to prosper. But the statistical figure is quite surprising and would need to closely to change the equation.

Can you folks please look at this closely to help the country?

 
At September 15, 2010 at 11:28:00 AM EDT , Anonymous Sam S. said...

I think this is great! I would also emphasize here that the focus is on celebrating LEGAL immigration.
Immigration is a great way to boost the talents and population of a country and we all have immigrant DNA in us in one way or another (even Native Americans are said to have crossed over to this continent during an ice age). As long as the immigrants follow the legal process all is well. once illegal immigration starts, then we have a problem just like with anything illegal.

 
At September 15, 2010 at 7:12:00 PM EDT , Anonymous JoeF said...

@September 14, 2010 2:44:00 PM EDT , Anonymous:

You probably should have mentioned that you copied an article from the New York Times.
Since some people are talking about legal, posting articles verbatim is a violation of copyright. Small excerpts would fall under fair use, but posting the whole article, and in addition without attribution, is not a good thing.
"Following the legal process", as one other poster suggested, starts with such seemingly small issues...

 
At September 16, 2010 at 2:28:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

No one cares about the agony of highly educated legal immigrants who can not change employers or get a promotion or a raise as the green card priority dates are not current for them. Lots of these legal immigrants are PhDs from American universities and can contribute tremendously to the economy if they get the flexibility of changing job etc. Please make the priority date current for these highly skilled and educated people so that they can receive EAD, use AC21 etc. May God bless you and God bless America!!!

 
At September 17, 2010 at 12:54:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Sorry for copiyng and pasting the last comment, but I think is important to raise our voices and make someone to care about our agony. I AGREE 100% with the last comment posted.

A friend of mine recently got his citizenship and he is bringing his parents from Venezuela to live in the USA. How come there is no wait or quota for his parents, while there are thousands of highly educated profesionals in agony... really... waiting for a green card? I like my friend and so his parents, but I think there's a big injustice for them to enter immedaitely into this society, when they don't even speak the language and of course they are not planning to work and contribuite to this big economy. How come there is no quota or wait time for them?, and yet I have been living legally in this country for 12 years, paying taxes and contibuting to the greatness of this country??

I'm into the Mexico EB3 category with priority date of June 2006. The visa bulletin in that category for October will be April 2001 !!! Really, the agony has been taking too long, and I'm not sure how much longer I'll be able to hold on. PLEASE HELP US !!

No one cares about the agony of highly educated legal immigrants who can not change employers or get a promotion or a raise as the green card priority dates are not current for them. Lots of these legal immigrants are PhDs from American universities and can contribute tremendously to the economy if they get the flexibility of changing job etc. Please make the priority date current for these highly skilled and educated people so that they can receive EAD, use AC21 etc. May God bless you and God bless America!!!

 
At September 17, 2010 at 1:11:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have friend who recently became an american citizen, and he is bringing his parents and his wife parents from Latin America to live here. How come there is NO quota or wait time for their parents who don’t even speak English, and they have no plans to work or contribute in any way to the economy of this country? In the other hand, there are thousands of highly educated professionals in agony for years waiting for a green card?
Sorry I copied and pasted the following post from a previous comment, but I think is very important to find someone to cares about our agony. Thanks
“No one cares about the agony of highly educated legal immigrants who cannot change employers or get a promotion or a raise as the green card priority dates are not current for them. Lots of these legal immigrants are PhDs from American universities and can contribute tremendously to the economy if they get the flexibility of changing job etc. Please make the priority date current for these highly skilled and educated people so that they can receive EAD, use AC21 etc. May God bless you and God bless America “

 
At September 17, 2010 at 5:20:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

To the above posters and all of us whom have contributed to this Blog. They don't care, or else they would be responding to our posts. It's like when you open a SR, they take the info down, but nothing happens with it.

The other day when I was going through immigration at Newark, the guy in front of us couldn't speak a lick of English.. you guessed it, was holding an American passport! While us non Green card holders ( L1B) were going through the 20 questions drill. The guy threw out his declaration from because he didn't understand the what to do with it! I bet I have been in the USA longer than he has, yet I can't even get a Green card!

I have been in the same job for 5 years.. I would love to take a new position and grow. But I am stuck doing the same lame job day in and day out until I get my green card.

 
At September 17, 2010 at 7:02:00 PM EDT , Anonymous JoeF said...

Since the 1960s, the US immigration policy has focused on family-based immigration.
That may or may not be appropriate, depending on a person's views.
However, being highly educated doesn't make a person somehow better than another person.
In fact, a highly educated person would not have such a bigoted view.
And somebody with a PhD can often get into the EB1 or EB2-NIW categories, which tend to be pretty fast.

 
At September 18, 2010 at 11:55:00 AM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Every year US issues 1.2 millions of green cards, and out of that just 0.14 million is given to Employment based green card, who are high earning people and contribute more to uncle sam's (TAX) federal expense. 90% of green card is given to tax burden people and ONLY 10% is given to tax contributors. But, this agency or federal govt doesn't even care about EB category people who wait for decades to get their green card. If they have such a idiotic policy, no one can stop talents going back to China and India.

 
At September 21, 2010 at 5:58:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

It is totally out of any logic to make somebody wait for a green card for decades. Please remember that this means same job, no professional wroth, applications for advance paroles every year and for work permits or visas every two years, our children will be able to go to college, and of course the uncertainty of being in this country with no warranties, and being afraid to leave the country because on your way back an immigration officer MAY NOT let you in. Yes, in reality, the possibility is always there.
I totally understand that the immigration law is focusing on a family-based immigration policy as well, and I also understand that any new American citizens can bring their immediate family to live in the USA, WITH NO WAIT TIME, but I still believe that is unfair what the government is doing with good and educated people who work and pay taxes in this country, who are fully contributors to this economy and society.
I don’t think that being highly educated makes a person somehow better than another person, but I do believe that the immigration law in this country needs to be changed. Being highly educated and honest is not a crime, but sometimes I feel we are being punished for it.

 
At September 27, 2010 at 12:09:00 AM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

When is the Employment Based I-485 Inventory going to be posted for August 2010?

 
At October 21, 2010 at 1:11:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

can anyone advise me: i came to the US in 2002 on a K1 fiancee visa, our relationship fell apart before we got married and my fiance being the hot headed one, bail on me, a few years later dies in prison!I continued living in the USA without him, I since fell in love, got married, I'm married to permanent US resident and have two children.will I ever be able to adjust my status without having to return to my country of origin because i came on a K1 visa?? I've been in the USA for 8yrs total.

worried mother of 2

 
At August 10, 2011 at 3:14:00 AM EDT , Anonymous The Ancestor Detector said...

Whether you are for or against immigration, everyone must remember one thing: we are ALL immigrants. Think about it. How long has your family been in the United States? One generation? Two? Did your grandparents or great-grandparents come through Ellis Island? Regardless of your position on immigration, learning more about your own family and seeing where each of your family lines originate can be an eye-opening experience.

 
At July 18, 2013 at 10:36:00 PM EDT , Anonymous mgig said...

I appreciate your post because it creates a reason for discussion, and to be thankful. Immigration is a problem in many countries. In the USA, it is not so much about immigration that is holding our country back, it is the politicians that is holding it back because all each of them are thinking about are how every decision they make might impact their party. They could care less about the American people. Fix the politics and everything else will follow.

 
At December 24, 2013 at 4:00:00 AM EST , Anonymous Amita said...

Great post.the uncertainty of being in this country with no warranties, and being afraid to leave the country because on your way back an immigration officer MAY NOT let you in. Yes, in reality, the possibility is always there.

 
At March 25, 2014 at 7:25:00 AM EDT , Anonymous akash said...

I think this is great! I would also emphasize here that the focus is on celebrating LEGAL immigration.
Immigration is a great way to boost the talents and population of a country and we all have immigrant DNA in us in one way or another (even Native Americans are said to have crossed over to this continent during an ice age).

 
At March 26, 2014 at 8:20:00 AM EDT , Anonymous vashikaran said...

That may or may not be appropriate, depending on a person's views.
However, being highly educated doesn't make a person somehow better than another person.
In fact, a highly educated person would not have such a bigoted view.
And somebody with a PhD can often get into the EB1 or EB2-NIW categories, which tend to be pretty fast.

 

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