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10 November 2010

Five Frequently Asked Question from Members of the Military and their Families

As a part of our work leading up to Veterans Day, we wanted to post a list of questions frequently asked by members of the military and members of their families - and provide the answers here.

1. How do I report a birth abroad?

According to the Department of State: "The birth of a child abroad to U.S. citizen parent(s) should be reported as soon as possible to the nearest American consular office for the purpose of establishing an official record of the child’s claim to U.S. citizenship at birth. The official record is in the form of a Consular Report of Birth Abroad of a Citizen of the United States of America. This document, referred to as the Consular Report of Birth or FS-240, is considered a basic United States citizenship document. An original FS-240 is furnished to the parent(s) at the time the registration is approved."

You can find more information on the Department of State’s website.

2. I’m not able to keep the ASC appointment in U.S. because I’m overseas with spouse and children. What do I need to do?

If you and your family are stationed abroad, you can submit two properly completed FD-258 Fingerprint Cards taken by:
  • U.S. Department of Homeland Security officials, 
  • U.S. Embassy or Consulate officials, or
  • U.S. Military Police,
3. I am an active duty military member stationed abroad. How do I check the status of my application?

You can check the status of any application by clicking on the “Check My Case Status” link on the USCIS homepage at www.uscis.gov. Please Note: when checking the status of a Petition to Remove the Conditions of Residence, Form I-751, you must use the receipt number from your ASC appointment notice. You may also check your case status by calling the USCIS Military Help Line at 877-CIS-4MIL (877-247-4645).

4. I am a military naturalization applicant. When am I permitted to file my Application for Naturalization, Form N-400?

If you are applying for naturalization through U.S. military service during a designated period of hostility, you may file the Application for Naturalization, Form N-400, once you have completed one day of honorable service on active duty or in the Selected Reserve of the Ready Reserve. In most cases, the earliest you can submit your application is during basic training. Individuals in the Delayed Entry Program (DEP) are typically not eligible to apply.

5. I am abroad and my conditional resident status will expire prior to my return to the United States. Can my spouse file the Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence (Form I-751) without my signature?

Yes. USCIS will accept Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence, Form I-751 without a signature if:
  • The form is signed by the conditional resident spouse and
  • Accompanied by the required evidence outlined in the form instructions and
  • Includes a copy of official orders abroad.
Make sure you contact the Military Help Line at 1-877-CIS-4MIL (1-877-247-4645) to notify USCIS when you return to the United States.

For more information about immigration benefits for members of the military and their family, please visit our website at www.uscis.gov/military.

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1 Comments:

At January 26, 2011 at 9:51:00 AM EST , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am a united states citizen and in the National Guard. MY stepfather who i see as my father was given 10yrs punishment for entering the united state illegally twice. Is there anything i can do to help him come back to the united states? I am being deployed in mid 2011 and dont want my mom to be alone. with the situation in mexico my mom is traveling to mexico constantly to be him and i also fear that something might happen to her. Is there anything i can do to help the situation?

 

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