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05 January 2011

USCIS News and Events Available on Twitter and YouTube

As part of our ongoing efforts to reach those we serve, USCIS has established accounts on both Twitter (@ uscis) and YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/uscis).

We invite you to follow us on Twitter to stay updated on the latest news, events, office closings and happenings around our agency.

On YouTube, we already have over 20 videos featuring news, naturalization ceremonies, informational “how to” guides and much more.

Please feel free to leave us feedback as to how we can best use these and other tools to keep you informed. 

6 Comments:

At January 13, 2011 at 11:34:00 AM EST , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I noticed your site answers some questions and not others. If we post on twitter or Facebook, will we have a better chance of getting a response to our questions? In one of my previous post, I did not have any of my questions answered(see below). Please take the time and answer our questions. PLEASE!!!! Let us know if you're going to respond to the questions being rasied in Blog. Thank You...

Sent December 26, 2010
We received an RFE for an I-130 we submitted in March 2009. Within the RFE we were asked to submit the very same information we provided when we submitted the I-130 in March 2009. Why would the USCIS waste time asking for information they already have? I read the RFE 10 times to make sure I was reading the instructions correctly, and it is very apparent that the same information was being requested that was originally submitted.

Why must this process take so long for people who are already married? If a tax paying American citizen has no previous criminal record, and their spouse (the person they are petitioning) has no previous criminal record, why must this process take so long? The evidence being requested appears to be a formality that anyone who intent on providing false information would not have a problem coming up with the information. We need to fix this process so that, every American citizen who is going through the immigration process the legal way, and paying all the fees that are requested, is not burden with unnecessary time delays, and unnecessary request for information that was originally submitted.

I will be having a meeting with both my US Senators (California), and I am going to bring this to their attention. I will show them the RFE I received from your office, and provide evidence of the matter I am mentioning in the above paragraphs.

There is certainly something wrong with this system and as tax payers we want to make sure we are getting what we are paying for.

Thank You
A

 
At February 13, 2011 at 1:34:00 PM EST , Anonymous Anonymous said...

EB 1-C..is it right?

Dear USCIS,

I would like to appraise you of a particular area of United States Immigration law that has a huge potential of fraud and misrepresentation along with being unfairly biased in favor of the people who choose to abuse it. I am talking about the Employment-based first preference category EB1C. As you are already probably aware, the requirements for eligibility in that category is just a year of overseas managerial experience in a company that conducts business in both US and abroad. I am sure you will agree that compared to the fair and stringent requirements of EB1A and EB1B, this is a rather simple qualification to prove. Moreover it opens up avenues for fraud and misrepresentation particularly by overseas companies doing business in USA to unfairly take advantage of this simple requirement.

The following example illustrates the fallacy:
Person A (originally from India) has a US masters degree in a STEM field and works for a company in a managerial job that requires a Masters degree and a few years of experience. This person can only file in EB2 category which is badly backlogged.

Person B (originally from India) has a bachelors degree in a STEM field and works for a company in a job that requires a Bachelors degree and a few years of experience. This person can only file in EB3 category which is even more severely backlogged.

In contrast, Person C (originally from India) works as some manager (over a year) in an Indian software company or a subsidary of an small American firm that also conducts business in the USA. This person can file in EB1C and will get preference over Persons A & B. Please note that for Person C, educational qualifications are irrelevant as there is no such requirement and moreover they are determined by the employing company. So potentially a person with a high school diploma can qualify in that category, not to mention that the prospect of frauds opens up exponentially. Contrast this with EB1A (persons of exceptional ability) and EB1B (outstanding researchers). In terms of immigration preference, person C is considered at par with a Nobel Prize worthy scholar (EB1A) or a renowned Researcher in a STEM field (EB1B). I am sure you are able to see the fallacy easily.

I would like to request you to kindly take up the matter with the appropriate authorities about this issue and restore some parity in the above categories.

Ideally the EB1C category should be abolished or downgraded to a lower preference category.

 
At February 13, 2011 at 6:33:00 PM EST , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Please dis-allow EB3 to EB2 porting...

Some people are misusing this provision to jump / cut the line. A person who filed EB2 and is genuinely waiting in the line for his turn never moves forward because people port from EB3 and get ahead of the line. A person who believes he qualifies for EB2 should open a new petition and once approved be given 50% of leeway on the priority date…for e.g if by porting EB3 priority date to EB2 a person gains 3 years of priority in the current scenario, should be allowed only to get 1.5 years of priority benefit by porting. This will reduce fraudulent motives to port as well.

 
At February 27, 2011 at 6:38:00 PM EST , Anonymous Anonymous said...

Employment Visa abuse...yet another case...

This lawsuit proves a point on how rampant the visa abuse has become..(pls read the link below)

http://www.courthousenews.com/2011/02/25/Infosys.pdf

Firms go to any extent to circumvent the rules. Esp..B1 and L1 B/ L1 A are the most abused visa categories. USCIS should force the companies to declare in public how many of their employees in the US are on these visa categories

Firms force their executives to write invite letters of support to apply H1-b and B1 visas when clients refuse to give such letters.

 
At April 7, 2011 at 2:15:00 PM EDT , Anonymous Duncan said...

EB 1-C..is it right?

Dear USCIS,

I would like to appraise you of a particular area of United States Immigration law that has a huge potential of fraud and misrepresentation along with being unfairly biased in favor of the people who choose to abuse it. I am talking about the Employment-based first preference category EB1C. As you are already probably aware, the requirements for eligibility in that category is just a year of overseas managerial experience in a company that conducts business in both US and abroad. I am sure you will agree that compared to the fair and stringent requirements of EB1A and EB1B, this is a rather simple qualification to prove. Moreover it opens up avenues for fraud and misrepresentation particularly by overseas companies doing business in USA to unfairly take advantage of this simple requirement.

 
At January 24, 2012 at 11:43:00 PM EST , Anonymous Anonymous said...

if the USCIS found out that the application is EB3 and because of the information in the application can be port to EB2, can the USCIS port EB3 to EB2 in their part? Just curious...

 

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