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23 June 2011

USCIS Field Office Director Ken Sherman: An Honor to Serve Those Who Serve

My last day as director of the USCIS field office in Seoul, South Korea, was June 2, 2011. While I am excited about my new job as director of the USCIS field office in Honolulu, Hawaii, I will miss my old job.

I will miss traveling across South Korea and to Afghanistan, China, Japan, Okinawa, the Philippines, and onboard Navy ships at sea to naturalize noncitizens in the military and their family members.

On May 20, 2011, USCIS Seoul Field Office Director Kenneth Sherman presided during a naturalization ceremony on the USS Essex at the Sasebo Naval Base in Japan for 46 sailors, Marines and military family members. (U.S. Navy photo)

On May 20, 2011, USCIS Seoul Field Office Director Kenneth Sherman presided during a naturalization ceremony on the USS Essex at the Sasebo Naval Base in Japan for 46 sailors, Marines and military family members. (U.S. Navy photo)

Last month, I had the honor of administering the Oath of Allegiance on the flight deck of the USS Essex to 46 sailors, Marines and military family members. In fact, this was the first naturalization ceremony for members of our Armed Forces and their families serving in Japan since the catastrophic earthquake and tsunami struck on March 11.

The colors are presented before the ceremony (U.S. Navy photo)

 The colors are presented before the ceremony (U.S. Navy photo)

It is always a privilege to administer the Oath of Allegiance, and I know I will continue to be so privileged in Hawaii. It was, however, especially rewarding to recognize this group from Sasebo Naval Base and Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni. Many of these men and women were scheduled to naturalize in March, but we postponed the ceremony while they participated in Operation Tomodachi, providing disaster relief and humanitarian assistance to the citizens of Japan.

Yes, I will miss this job, but I will never miss the commitment and service to others demonstrated by the men and women of the U.S. armed forces.

Kenneth J. Sherman

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3 Comments:

At June 29, 2011 at 10:37:00 AM EDT , Anonymous Anonymous said...

You've done a wonderful job traveling to distant places in often times difficult conditions to reach these brave young men and women supporting our country who have yet to be afforded the benefits of US citizenship. Without hardworking officers like you, their path to US citizenship would be extremely difficult and they may be focused on worries of how their lack of citizenship affects their families instead of focusing on their important work at hand. Thank you for all your years of dedication to try to reach each and everyone of them working and fighting abroad for the US.

 
At July 4, 2011 at 4:33:00 AM EDT , Anonymous Dennis (html tutorials) said...

Man, those pictures took me back to my Navy days aboard the USS Independence (now decommissioned). I realize the photos weren't aboard a ship, but there were many times we stood on the flight deck, fully dressed out for inspection.

I'm an old guy now, but I salute today's military for taking up the mantle of freedom and serving all of us. And yes, I can still salute with a straight wrist. :)

 
At February 18, 2013 at 2:13:00 PM EST , Anonymous Bangladesh said...

Salute to Kenneth Sherman.

 

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